Tag Archive: news


Adam West, the man who played Batman on TV in the 1960s, will be a voice in Lego Batman 3: Beyond Gotham Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment announced on the game’s official Twitter feed.

The picture accompanying the tweet leads us to believe that West has been cast as a Lego-fied version of himself and will only make a small cameo. For many Batman fans, though, his inclusion on any scale is a welcome nod to the character’s storied past.

West portrayed Batman in 120 half-hour episodes of what was a smash hit for ABC from 1966-1968, plus a full-length feature film that came out between the first and second seasons of the TV show’s run. Warner Bros. just announced the entire TV series will be released on DVD/Blu-ray for the first time this November. In recent years, West has seen a resurgence in popularity, in large part due to his role as “Mayor West” in FOX’s Family Guy, and got his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in April of 2012.

He joins an ever-expanding cast of accomplished actors/voice actors, led by Troy Baker as Batman and Dee Bradley Baker as Brainiac. West will also be a part of the Lego Batman 3: Beyond Gotham panel being held at San Diego ComicCon next week.

Lego Batman 3: Beyond Gotham is coming out sometime this fall on Xbox One, PS4, Xbox 360, PS3, PC, Wii U, 3DS, and PS Vita.

 

Ubisoft Quebec, Ubisoft Montreal’s sister studio, is ready to step out of its older sibling’s shadow by taking on an Assassin’s Creed all it’s own, Ubisoft announced on the company’s official blog this morning.

Ubisoft Montreal has spearheaded every Assassin’s Creed thus far, often with help from various members of Ubisoft’s global network of developers. But with Ubisoft Quebec’s recent $28 million dollar investment, $4 million of which is going to a brand new workspace designed specifically for triple-A game development, the studio is ready to spread its eagle wings and show off what they can do.

“We have the confidence of the brand team and also from Ubisoft to take leadership of an upcoming Assassin’s Creed title,” Ubisoft Quebec managing director Nicolas Rioux said. “The team is ready for the next big step.”

Ubisoft Quebec is very familiar with the franchise, of course, having helped out on every entry since Brotherhood and even spearheading The Tyranny of King Washington and Freedom Cry DLC for AC III and AC IV. The next big step for them now is bolstering their work force. Already 350 people work at Ubisoft Quebec (including some starting the groundwork for this new project), and the studio plans to reach 425 people by 2017.

With multiple studios helping out Assassin’s Creed on an annual basis (including as many as 10 for Unity), it only makes sense that at some point another studio would just take the reigns completely themselves for a title, much like how Activision has a three-studio rotation with Call of Duty.  What Quebec’s Assassin’s Creed will entail is anybody’s guess, but it only cements the fact that Assassin’s Creed has plans to stick around for quite some time.

As for this year, Assassin’s Creed Unity launches on Windows PC, PS4, and Xbox One on October 28.

Another Mighty No. 9 update came out this weekend on Comcept USA’s corresponding Kickstarter page, giving everyone a fresh glimpse at the game as well as detailing some changes that are coming to Beck’s partner, Call.

The bulk of the update came in the form of another gameplay video (embedded above) that sees Beck work his way through Mighty No. 2 and 5’s stages. While the bosses themselves are only briefly featured towards the end of the footage, you see key gameplay features again on display, like Beck’s various horizontal and vertical dash abilities.

The update also showed off a minor redesign of Call, Beck’s robotic assistant. Call became a playable character when the Kickstarter for Mighty No. 9 reached its $2,750,000 stretch goal, and because of this, some early animations of her running and crawling were also shown off. Since Call can’t perform a crouching dash like Beck, she resorts to crawling through tight  spaces, which is just one of the ways the two robots differ from each other.

The update also mentions that Keiji Inafune will be part of a panel at Anime Expo this weekend in Los Angeles, suggesting some more “mighty” information might come out of it.

Mighty No. 9 is currently slated for a spring 2015 release on PS4, Xbox One, PS3, Xbox 360, PC, Mac, Linux, PS Vita, and Nintendo 3DS.

Concerning a new Bad Company installment, it’s not a matter of DICE ignoring their fanbase, they’re just unsure what made Bad Company so popular, CEO Karl-Magnus Troedsson explained in a recent interview with Eurogamer.

“Some people say they found the multiplayer controls faster and more direct,” Troedsson told Eurogamer. “Some people liked the single-player and the characters and the humor. People love different things about it. It’s starting to almost get to that place where, if we were to make a sequel to Bad Company, what would than even imply?

“It’s scary to go back and try to remake an old fan favorite when actually no-one can really put their finger on what it is people love. Bringing back the characters and creating a great single-player out of that, sure, I can understand that.

“But some people say this: the Bad Company 2 multiplayer is the best you’ve ever done. Okay, why is that? It’s hard for people to articulate what that is, which is actually hard for us. It would be hard to remake something like that. Can we do it? Of course. We have our theories when it comes to the multiplayer.”

It sounds to me—and you can call my crazy here, Karl—that both the single-player and multiplayer were so good that the Bad Company games offered different things to a multitude of players. Maybe the reason you can’t put your finger on what made it great and people keep giving you different answers is that you appealed to such a wide audience, for once, that a lot of different people found something to love. Definitely not something that can be said for Battlefield 3 or 4.

Troedsson closed by offering Bad Company fans the faintest glimmer of hope, saying the sub-brand is not dead and it can be revived—but unless it’s suddenly revealed that Preston, Sweetwater, Haggard, and Sarge have suddenly become the funniest boys in blue since Steve Gutenberg and gang in Police Academy—those fans will definitely have to wait at least a little while longer.

It’s rare to get a collection of some of the best and brightest names in gaming under one roof, but that’s exactly what happened at the 2014 D.I.C.E. Summit in Las Vegas. One of this year’s themes was how many game developers feel we’re in a Golden Age of Gaming. So, taking advantage of this rare opportunity, we decided to ask these great minds just what we might expect over the next 5 to 10 years from this perceived Golden Age.

Freddie Wong
Co-Founder, RocketJump
More indie games. They’re the only games I have the patience for now. I don’t finish a lot of triple-A titles anymore. I’d rather just sit down and do two hours of something, and I’m more willing to pay that price.

Felicia Day
Co-Founder, Geek & Sundry
Really good hair. There’s nothing grosser than when you create an RPG character, and it just looks like they’ve never washed their hair. It’s all spiky and disgusting. It looks like dyed straw, and I hate it.

Victor Kislyi
CEO, Wargaming.net
I think no matter what happens with technology, that we, as game developers and publishers, will keep concentrating on the game experience, and that will be the key to our success in the future. We have to provide to the users the best possible experiences in regards to gameplay and service, and that will keep the future bright.

Richard Hilleman
Chief Creative Director, Electronic Arts
I think it’s going to be an interesting next 10 years as the rest of the world decides they get to have some influence on what the gaming business is, too. And it’ll introduce us to a whole new collection of gaming styles, to different business models, to new characters—and, most importantly, to new developers who will make really exciting stuff.

Ted Price
President, Insomniac Games
I think you’re going to see a large number of new IPs that are really pushing the boundaries in terms of what players expect. I think, after seeing—and we’re certainly guilty of this as well— a lot of shooters on the last-gen platforms, a lot of stuff felt like we’d seen it before. There’s a big push from both large and small companies to change the rules for players. What does that mean? Well, just look at 2014. It means a lot of brand-new and surprising IPs.

Matias Myllyrinne
CEO, Remedy Entertainment
I think we’re at an interesting junction point. There have been a lot of trends and courses laid creating a perfect storm in many ways. We have massive ecosystems with digital distribution coming in, and then we’re having increasingly powerful machines and new business models and games as a service. I think we’re going to have this massive connected living room, and I wouldn’t be surprised if, even in just two or three years, we start interacting with fiction in a different form.

Eugene Jarvis
President, Raw Thrills
It’s a rough world out there. One percent of the apps take 90 percent of the revenue, and 99 percent of the guys are getting run over by the Google bus. So, there’s this huge emphasis on monetization, how to make your game make money, and I think the industry is almost going off a cliff where the monetization is driving the creativity so much that we all end up making the same game. Just trying to trap the player, hold him upside down, and shake the money out of his pockets. I think, in the future, this is going to just collapse, and we’re going to start thinking about making games to be fun again and not be so obsessed with this monetization thing.

Neil Druckmann
Creative Director, Naughty Dog
We’re all going to be in the Matrix, but we won’t know that we’re in the Matrix, and then [Naughty Dog Game Director] Bruce [Straley] is going to be the one who fights for us all to get out.

Randy Pitchford
President and CEO, Gearbox Software
It’s really exciting right now, because we’re crossing the threshold where everyone is a gamer. If you rewind to the beginning of the last generation, more than half the population didn’t play games. Our grandparents had no idea what was going on. But the Wii got grandma bowling. Smartphones have brought all kinds of new games to all kinds of people. Everyone now is a gamer. That’s really exciting. Now, it’s going to be about that we can try anything, and we’ll find an audience. When you combine the spectrum of platforms with the width of the audience, we can try anything. As long as we’re smart about how many people might be interested in what we’re doing, I think you’re going to see a lot of risky and exciting games. A lot of things we’ve never seen before.

Palmer Luckey
Founder, Oculus VR
I don’t know what the future will look like. I think virtual reality will play an important part in it. I think indie games are going to be more and more polished. I think the creation tools that allow people to make games are going to be easier to use and allow for better and better games with less and less effort. It was really hard to make good-looking games a couple of years ago, but I think tools like Unity have made that whole process so much easier, so I think you’ll start having more amazing games from smaller teams.

Patrick Hudson
President, Robot Entertainment
What I think is fascinating is a developer anywhere in the world can now reach consumers anywhere in the world. Everyone has a smartphone in their pocket. The access to high-speed bandwidth is pervasive globally. So, I think you’ll see gaming grow more globally, reaching markets that were never reachable before so you might see gaming become just as important in Zimbabwe as it is in North America in the next decade.

Jean Guesdon
Creative Director, Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag
I’d be rich if I knew what was coming. [Laughs] But I think it’ll be interesting to see what emerges from the mix of these highly capable consoles and all these social and mobile mechanics, and whatever comes from that will be something to keep an eye on.

Lucas Pope
Developer, Papers, Please
VR. I think VR is the future. Once it becomes accessible with the Oculus Rift, I think everything’s going to change in how games are made and sold.

Tameem Antoniades
Co-Founder and Chief Creative Director, Ninja Theory
What I think is you’ll see is a shift away from games being designed by publishers for gamers and instead see gamers designing games for themselves. I think there’ll be much more of a homebrew scene, where technology will be awesome and game engines will be so powerful that small bands of people will be able to come together and make incredible games. I think the future will be less corporate-driven and more gamer-driven.

Troy Baker
Voice Actor, The Last of Us
I think that what we’re doing right now is that we’re not only redefining what games look like, but we’re also redefining how players play them. I think, to some extent, gamers have gotten a little spoiled. Now we’re shaking things up, and gamers are able to participate in the infrastructure of how their games are presented to them. I think that’s an exciting opportunity for publishers to listen to their audience and collaborate with them in not only creating the content but also in how the content gets to them, so I’m excited to see how that relationship grows over the course of the next generation.

Rex Crowle
Creative Lead, Media Molecule
I think we’ll just see more and more games seeping out of our screens and interacting with our reality, from new display methods to all kinds of crazy science-fiction stuff.

Steve Gaynor
Co-Founder, The Fullbright Company
I think we’re going to see another big, must-have item that people will move to, like mobile was for the last generation. I can’t pretend to tell you what it may be, though.

Be sure to check out EGM Issue #263, available now on newsstands everywhere, to hear these and other gaming personalities share their thoughts on the flip side of this topic: what they thought was the most important aspect of the last generation of hardware.

In today’s Super Smash Bros. oriented Nintendo Direct, game director Masahiro Sakurai announced two separate release windows for the 3DS and Wii U versions of Nintendo’s flagship fighter.

The 3DS version of Smash Bros. will see a summer 2014 release, but in a shocking turn, the Wii U version won’t hit store shelves until Winter 2014.

While this could potentially promote consumers to buy both versions of the game and help keep Nintendo from directly competing with itself, it also looks bad for the Wii U, which desperately needs a potential system selling game like this to hit sooner rather later.

Aside from the release dates, specific game modes and new characters were also detailed during the 39-minute video presentation.

Industry veteran and current Microsoft Studios creative director Ken Lobb explained that Black Tusk’s take on Gears of War would be “innovative” and run on Unreal 4 in a recent interview with Edge.

“I think the reality is what we have is innovative Gears Of War. That’s what I believe they’re going to make,” said Lobb. “They’re an internal studio, but the reality is it’s cool to have [an IP] that can be a grand slam right out of the gate. The concepts they’ve been toying with are awesome. You take what they were thinking about and their expertise on Unreal Engine 4, because that’s what they’ve been playing with since their founding, and really go with the IP.”

Ken Lobb has worked in the games industry for over 20 years, helping craft such memorable classics as G.I. Joe for the NES and Goldeneye 007 for the N64 (he’s who the infamous Klobb was named after). He even took part in the discussions that led to Metroid Prime before joining Microsoft in 2001.

Black Tusk is a relatively new first-party studio, founded in 2012 under the Microsoft banner, and was supposedly working on an original IP before being charged with Gears of War. To help get the feel of the franchise, long-time Gears of War producer Rod Fergusson was also brought on as studio manager when Black Tusk took on the project.

No other details about this new Gears of War project have come out yet, as Black Tusk only began work on the project a few months ago.

The Pokémon Company has announced that Pokémon X/Y have together sold 12 million units worldwide, making them the best-selling 3DS game currently available.

It was revealed at the beginning of 2014 that the game had cracked the 11.6 million mark, so it seems to still be selling decently well considering it’s been on store shelves for six months now.

Pokémon X/Y also set the bar for the fastest selling 3DS game back when it was released in October. It sold four million copies in its first two days available, although this might be attributed partially to it being the first simultaneous global release for the franchise.

It should be noted that while these are impressive numbers, X/Y still only cracks the top five of all-time best-selling Pokémon games as Diamond/Pearl’s 17.63 million units, Ruby/Sapphire’s 16.22 million units, Black/White’s 15.42 million units, and HeartGold/SoulSilver’s 12.67 million units still sit ahead of it.

With these updated numbers, the Pokémon series has sold more than 245 million units worldwide.

To see what I thought of Pokémon X/Y when it came out, check out my review.

Ubisoft Toronto is working on five unannounced projects, two of which are being co-developed with other studios, managing director Jade Raymond revealed to Toronto’s The Star at SXSW yesterday.

While her talk was devoid of details for these projects, Raymond did provide a peek at Ubisoft’s mindset, talking about more blockbuster, AAA-franchises with comic book and movie tie-ins coming down the line. Even though the idea of potential “transmedia” IP is at the forefront of many minds at Ubisoft, Raymond reiterated that the company’s focus remains on games first.

“Our business is making games, so we have to make sure we’re making good games, first and foremost,” Raymond said. “I don’t think we can think out the gate, ‘How is this going to be a good movie?’ I don’t know anything about movies. I’ve never made a movie in my life.”

Raymond also mentioned that diversifying Ubisoft’s library beyond console/PC titles and having exclusive mobile franchises is a priority for her as well. According to her, games with a strong social element will only continue to grow in popularity over the coming years.

Jade Raymond is probably best known in game development for her role as producer on the original Assassin’s Creed before helping found Ubisoft Toronto in 2009. So far, the studio has only worked with their older sister Ubisoft Montreal on last year’s Splinter Cell: Blacklist. They are currently, supposedly, helping out with the constantly-in-limbo Rainbow Six: Patriots.

Wolfenstein: The New Order, The Evil Within, and Dishonored art books are on their way through a partnership with Dark Horse Comics, Bethesda announced today.

The first of these books, The Art of Wolfenstein: The New Order, takes a look at MachineGames’ upcoming first-person shooter set in an alternate timeline to the original Wolfenstein games. It will be released first at comic book retailers May 14, then bookstores later on May 27. The art book spans more than 200 pages and features concept art, designer commentary, in-depth looks at settings and technology, and more.

The Art of The Evil Within will be released sometime in August. Bethesda did not mention a specific date, but it is currently  listed on Amazon as the same date as the game: August 26.

The third and final art book Dark Horse and Bethesda are producing is Dishonored: Dunwall Archives, expected to hit shelves sometime in November.

All three books will retail for $39.99.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 53 other followers